James Blair Hall, Constructed 1934-1935

James Blair Hall, known as Marshall-Wythe Hall until 1968, is located on the west end of the Sunken. It currently houses the Philosophy and History departments as well as some administrative offices. The building is named after James Blair, founder and first President of William & Mary from 1693-1743.

The building was constructed as part of a Public Works Administration grant. It was built between 1934 and 1935 and was intended to house the Marshall-Wythe School of Government and Citizenship.

In 1936, the second and third floors were occupied by the departments of Economics, Government, History, Sociology, and the School of Jurisprudence. A dedication ceremony for the building was held in April 1937. In 1943, during World War II, the Navy Chaplain's School was located on the second floor.

Images

James Blair Hall, undated.

James Blair Hall, undated.

An undated photograph of James Blair Hall. | Source: University Archives Photograph Collection, UA 8. | Creator: College of William and Mary. View File Details Page

Marshall-Wythe Hall, circa 1936.

Marshall-Wythe Hall, circa 1936.

Marshall-Wythe Hall, now known as James Blair Hall, circa 1936. | Source: University Archives Photograph Collection, UA 8. | Creator: College of William and Mary. View File Details Page

Construction on Blair Hall, 1995

Construction on Blair Hall, 1995

Continuing construction on James Blair Hall on November 16, 1995. | Source: University Archives Photograph Collection, UA 8. | Creator: College of William and Mary. View File Details Page

Photograph of James Blair Portrait, undated

Photograph of James Blair Portrait, undated

Photograph of an oil painting of James Blair, founder and first President of William & Mary from 1693-1743. by J. Hargreaves in 1705. | Source: University Archives Photograph Collection, UA 8. | Creator: College of William and Mary. View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William and Mary., “James Blair Hall, Constructed 1934-1935,” TribeTrek, accessed July 24, 2017, http://tribetrek.wm.edu/items/show/7.
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